Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Errors Never Sounded so Good

As part of a promotional offer for signing up to get high-speed internet access at my house, we received a one year subscription to Napster. Napster is an online music subscription company that stores millions of songs for people to listen to. The promotional offer sounded GREAT…with unlimited downloads of music for one year. The reality of the situation is much less optimistic.

None of the downloaded music can be transferred to a CD for listening to in the car or at work. The music can only be played on this same computer that downloads it. That one computer has to remain connected to the internet so Napster can continuously monitor whether or not you retain the rights to listen to these songs. I’m not very pleased with my subscription, because I would really like to listen to these songs on my iPod, but Napster has an approved list of MP3 players, and the iPod is not one of them.

And to top it off, after a year, if I choose not to extent my Napster subscription, any music I have downloaded will expire, and the music on my computer will forever be silenced.

Maybe if I copied this music over and over between two folders on my computer, night and day thousands…millions of times, the music files would get copied incorrectly on an occasion or 2. Perhaps these copying errors would add new and exciting guitar riffs to the music. Maybe the copying errors would inadvertently invalidate the security on the files and allow them to be copied to other computers, MP3 players, or even CD’s. But if I were a betting man, I’d think that these copying errors would make the files completely invalid to the point where they would no longer be able to be played…even on my computer.

Darwinists think that copying errors will add new and exciting “guitar riffs” to the music of DNA. Some copying errors might even extend a fish’s ability to climb out of the water and survive beyond its submarine confinement. The entire mechanism of evolution is built upon the premise that the aggregate of copying errors allow organisms to grow new parts and extend their environments beyond their siblings. Then natural selection will “select” these new advantages for future generations. It’s far more likely, however, that the adventurous fish would have removed itself from the gene pool by getting trapped on land and either suffocated or become dinner for a predator. Just like the restricted files, copying errors invalidate the part of the DNA in organisms that mutated.

Now, I’ve heard that some intelligent designers have built programs to remove the security from these Napster music files, so if anyone has information about where I can find one of these programs, please let me know. :-)

1 comment:

Wilhelmine said...

You never get anything for nothing and you get what you pay for. That is a fact of life.